Charcoal sketch Pan Pastels

Pan Pastels

I always like to feel like i am in uncharted waters with the art i do and never want to make it a perfect science. So i really enjoy trying different mediums and tools to keep the door open for a different type of growth as an artist.

This is a sketch i did the other night using Pan pastels along with workable fixative.
Basically i create a layer then spray the fixative and begin on the other.It helps to lock my edges into place and also allows freedom to try different things.(almost like creating an adjustment layer in Photoshop)

Skin Art mag (In the studio with Brian Murphy)

This is a great opportunity to share the art that the tattoo community has been creating recently. It will also be in future issues of Skin Art so keep your eye out for it.
Also if you feel like you have some unique art you would like to share in my gallery tag me on instagram @bmurphysart or @ tattoomedia

Front page Story today about my involvment in Tattoo media publishing.

    • MARSHALLS CREEK

      Tattoo shop owner puts ink on paper

      Becomes co-owner of six classic magazines

    • emailprint

      0

  • Brain Murphy, of Third Dimension Tattoo Studio, works on a neck tattoo on Vinny Kearney of Long Island, New York. Murphy recently acquired six tattoo-themed magazines, including the one pictured here. Kearney has been tattooed various times by Murphy. This tattoo willl be a crypt keeper.  (Melissa Evanko/Pocono Record) |

    Brain Murphy, of Third Dimension Tattoo Studio, works on a neck tattoo on Vinny Kearney of Long Island, New York. Murphy recently acquired six tattoo-themed magazines, including the one pictured here. Kearney has been tattooed various times by Murphy. This tattoo willl be a crypt keeper. (Melissa Evanko/Pocono Record)

    • By Beth Brelje
      Pocono Record Writer

      Posted Nov. 13, 2014 @ 10:52 pm

      Brian Murphy, owner of Third Dimension Tattoo in Marshalls Creek, has become co-owner of six classic magazine titles that will now be based in the Poconos.

      The magazines are Outlaw Biker, Skin Art, Tattoo Revue, Tattoos for Men, Tattoos for Women and Tabu Tattoo.

      Murphy was invited to partner with Carlo Fodera, owner of New York-based Technical Tattoo Supply, which sells inks and other tattoo supplies.

      Technical Tattoo Supply advertised in the magazines, and Fodera learned that founder Casey Exton, at 83, was ready to turn the titles over to someone else.

      Exton started Outlaw Biker in the 1980s and added the other titles along the way.

      Ownership of the magazines transferred in September, Murphy said.

      Readers can expect some changes. There will be thicker, glossy paper and issues will be bound more like a book instead of with staples, giving the publications a more substantial, higher-quality feel. For the first time, the magazines will also be offered digitally.

      “We are not sure we are keeping all the titles. Outlaw Biker, Skin Art and Tattoo Revue will definitely stay. The others may come out less frequently. That is still being determined,” Murphy said.

      The titles have been on autopilot for the last few years, pulling old content from back issues, Murphy said.

      All the titles show scantily clad women and target edgy subcultures. Tabu Tattoo features gothic models, body modification, piercings and body suspension in which participants hang from hooks pierced through the skin.

      Outlaw Biker has a circulation of 55,000 bimonthly readers, and the other titles are close to that, Murphy said.

      He acknowledges the magazine industry has changed, especially for the very visual tattoo industry.

      Today, most people go to Instagram to look at tattoo art. An Instagram account is free compared to $16,000 to publish just one issue of Skin Art.

      Murphy’s motivation is more art than money.

      “I’m a painter. There are a lot of other painters in the tattoo industry. We’ve developed a genre of art that the fine art world is ignoring. Skin Art is a great opportunity to use it as a platform to share what the industry is doing. Money-wise, it’s a tough thing.”

      This is a time of a tattoo renaissance, with more tattoo artists and more people getting tattoos.

      “There is no modern art that is loved like tattoo art. There is no more popular art than modern tattoo work. Yet, you will never see the work done by tattoo artists in the Museum of Modern Art,” Murphy said, and the magazines are the art gallery for the industry.

    – See more at: http://www.poconorecord.com/article/20141113/NEWS/141119750#sthash.CTw0kJfW.dpuf

      • MARSHALLS CREEK

        Tattoo shop owner puts ink on paper

        Becomes co-owner of six classic magazines

      • emailprint

        0

    • Brain Murphy, of Third Dimension Tattoo Studio, works on a neck tattoo on Vinny Kearney of Long Island, New York. Murphy recently acquired six tattoo-themed magazines, including the one pictured here. Kearney has been tattooed various times by Murphy. This tattoo willl be a crypt keeper.  (Melissa Evanko/Pocono Record) |

      Brain Murphy, of Third Dimension Tattoo Studio, works on a neck tattoo on Vinny Kearney of Long Island, New York. Murphy recently acquired six tattoo-themed magazines, including the one pictured here. Kearney has been tattooed various times by Murphy. This tattoo willl be a crypt keeper. (Melissa Evanko/Pocono Record)

      • By Beth Brelje
        Pocono Record Writer

        Posted Nov. 13, 2014 @ 10:52 pm

        Brian Murphy, owner of Third Dimension Tattoo in Marshalls Creek, has become co-owner of six classic magazine titles that will now be based in the Poconos.

        The magazines are Outlaw Biker, Skin Art, Tattoo Revue, Tattoos for Men, Tattoos for Women and Tabu Tattoo.

        Murphy was invited to partner with Carlo Fodera, owner of New York-based Technical Tattoo Supply, which sells inks and other tattoo supplies.

        Technical Tattoo Supply advertised in the magazines, and Fodera learned that founder Casey Exton, at 83, was ready to turn the titles over to someone else.

        Exton started Outlaw Biker in the 1980s and added the other titles along the way.

        Ownership of the magazines transferred in September, Murphy said.

        Readers can expect some changes. There will be thicker, glossy paper and issues will be bound more like a book instead of with staples, giving the publications a more substantial, higher-quality feel. For the first time, the magazines will also be offered digitally.

        “We are not sure we are keeping all the titles. Outlaw Biker, Skin Art and Tattoo Revue will definitely stay. The others may come out less frequently. That is still being determined,” Murphy said.

        The titles have been on autopilot for the last few years, pulling old content from back issues, Murphy said.

        All the titles show scantily clad women and target edgy subcultures. Tabu Tattoo features gothic models, body modification, piercings and body suspension in which participants hang from hooks pierced through the skin.

        Outlaw Biker has a circulation of 55,000 bimonthly readers, and the other titles are close to that, Murphy said.

        He acknowledges the magazine industry has changed, especially for the very visual tattoo industry.

        Today, most people go to Instagram to look at tattoo art. An Instagram account is free compared to $16,000 to publish just one issue of Skin Art.

        Murphy’s motivation is more art than money.

        “I’m a painter. There are a lot of other painters in the tattoo industry. We’ve developed a genre of art that the fine art world is ignoring. Skin Art is a great opportunity to use it as a platform to share what the industry is doing. Money-wise, it’s a tough thing.”

        This is a time of a tattoo renaissance, with more tattoo artists and more people getting tattoos.

        “There is no modern art that is loved like tattoo art. There is no more popular art than modern tattoo work. Yet, you will never see the work done by tattoo artists in the Museum of Modern Art,” Murphy said, and the magazines are the art gallery for the industry.

      – See more at: http://www.poconorecord.com/article/20141113/NEWS/141119750#sthash.CTw0kJfW.dpuf

       

       

       

       

      Brain Murphy, of Third Dimension Tattoo Studio, works on a neck tattoo on Vinny Kearney of Long Island, New York. Murphy recently acquired six tattoo-themed magazines, including the one pictured here. Kearney has been tattooed various times by Murphy. This tattoo willl be a crypt keeper.  (Melissa Evanko/Pocono Record)

      Nov. 14 2014 Front page of Pocono record. Click image for complete story.

      Brain Murphy, of Third Dimension Tattoo Studio, works on a neck tattoo on Vinny Kearney of Long Island, New York. Murphy recently acquired six tattoo-themed magazines, including the one pictured here. Kearney has been tattooed various times by Murphy. This tattoo willl be a crypt keeper. (Melissa Evanko/Pocono Record) – See more at: http://www.poconorecord.com/article/20141113/NEWS/141119750#sthash.CTw0kJfW.dpuf

       

      Alla prima

      This is a little in progress shot of a recent self portrait I did in oils. It’s approx 12″ high 10″ wide

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      Live painting at NEPA tattoo festival

      So I had a great day yesterday between judging the work at the show I was able to spend some time with one of the only people I have ever apprenticed and good friend Mike Mara to work on a large painting.
      Here are a few photos of what we had the time to do. IMG_3920.JPG

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      NEPA convention judging/live painting

      So this weekend was really nice. I spent my time looking at all the amazing work being done at the show and then was able to have an opportunity to judge the tattoo and fine art at this event with Megan Massacre from tv shows NY ink and Americas worst tattoos.

      That’s never an easy task. Considering how many styles along with what the artist or clients vision actually was.
      In the end it was a great opportunity to get an up close look at the work so I really enjoyed that along with being around so many positive art loving people made it a very nice time.

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